Should You Buy Your Own Briquetting Equipment to Recycle Waste Wood?

Producing briquettes is one of the most popular means of waste wood recycling. This activity can be a viable source of revenue for businesses that generate a ton of sawdust and wood shavings from timber projects. With briquetting, the raw materials are turned into biomass fuel through a process called torrefaction by specialised equipment. Compared to traditional logs, wooden briquettes burn longer, emit less smoke and leave only little mess. These recycled products are extremely hydrophobic too, which means they resist moisture well to render relatively damp areas a good candidate for storage.

Briquetting does not always make a lucrative venture; it can save construction and refurbishment companies money on waste disposal at the very least. Will it be worth your while to invest in briquetting machines? Whether you want to help conserve the environment, hope to get handsome returns, or both, do the following to determine the feasibility of your plan:

Study the Market

First of all, find out how many establishments use wood briquettes and how many competitors you have in the region. It will tell you how much you need to spend on marketing and what challenges you might encounter in terms of delivery. It can be hard enough to recoup your initial investment, and it will take a longer time to break even to earn the money you will spend.

Tap your existing network to gather enough information about the local market. Also, research any law governing briquetting to learn about the other essentials you need to run your business.

Estimate How Much Sawdust and Wood Shavings You Generate

wood shaving

Your wood briquette production depends on the number of raw materials you generate. If you do not produce a lot of sawdust and wood shavings on a regular basis, consider contacting a recycler instead of buying a briquetting machine. Generate less than five tonnes of waste wood should make you think twice before pulling the trigger on such an investment.

Think About Space

Briquetting machines come in a variety of sizes, but they will consume some space. If you cannot place your equipment near where you generate your sawdust and wood shavings, you will have to worry about transportation too. The cost to move your raw materials from one place to another might offset the revenue and environmental impact you wish to make.

Do Not Forget About Maintenance

Advanced briquetting machines can be fully automated, but they need care and attention to stay in good repair. Determine how much you need to spend on upkeep to assess whether the equipment is worth buying.

If you want to keep your wood waste from ending in landfills but hate the hassles of owning a briquetting machine, contact a recycler instead. Let the other party worry about the dirty work, and feel good about knowing your sawdust and wood shavings get a new lease of life. Briquetting is a promising proposition, but put it on hold for now until your business scales up production to sustain it for a long time.